Tag Archives: bike

My once-yearly, you know I’m good for it, and I’m really sincere fundraising ask

Little known fact about me: several years ago I thought I might like to be a Victoria Hospice volunteer, and I signed up for an information session and tour to see if it might be a good fit for me to go on and take the training.

20140206-082914.jpgIf I’ve already convinced you to donate, just skip to my fundraising page: bit.ly/ToriRide and leave a donation. If not, please read on …

Turns out it wasn’t right for me at that time, but my eyes were opened to what Hospice care means for terminally ill people and their families. I saw first hand the importance of hospice facilities and care, the unique requirements involved, the dedication of the staff and volunteers. After experiencing the loss of family members myself, I am astonished (in a good way) at the strength, caring, and courage of people who work to make someone’s last days and hours more comfortable.

Those who know me, know I’m not one to throw a bucket of ice on my head and post the video on YouTube (more power to those who do!), but I do like to help my preferred charities in other ways.

This year, I’m riding my bike for 60 kilometres to raise money for Victoria Hospice on September 7. My team (Team Blood, Sweat, and Gears) has set ourselves a modest goal of raising $250. It won’t take much to meet that goal, and that’s why I’m asking for a little bit of help from my friends.

It goes all the way up to 11

It goes all the way up to 11

You know I only go to the well (my friends and family) at most once per year. You know I only raise funds for organizations I’m personally involved with in some way, doing good work in the community. I believe wholeheartedly in the work of the Victoria Hospice. Won’t you help me reach my team fundraising goal today? I won’t ask you again. Not even at Christmastime!

Just a $10 donation will help. Twenty or more would be better, but $10 is all I ask. It only takes a minute: bit.ly/ToriRide. And you have my gratitude. If you donate $50 though, you have my gratitude and an invitation to our next dinner party. 🙂

I’m only asking once, so please head over to bit.ly/ToriRide and get out your credit card.

 

 

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When the going gets tough, the tough go bike shopping

When I originally got injured back in January, my doctor and physiotherapist thought I’d be back to training in six weeks.

Two months later, I am still trying not to limp, and to straighten my leg. Matt (the Physiotherapist) delivered the bad news a few weeks ago: “You’re going to have to re-evaluate your races this season. Maybe do some relays. Maybe a Gran Fondo, but not until Fall, depending on the MRI and surgical consult.”

So – yeah – it is probably a meniscus tear. I just have to accept it and work around it best I can.

I’ve been attending a lot of the Vancouver Island Race Series events, cheering on friends: Delani, Mandy, Damien, Brenda, Torunn and Bart (and others).

I’ve been swimming three times a week and I’ve really improved my form in the last two months. And now, I’m back on my bike. In fact, it’s easier to bike than to walk anywhere. During the time I could neither walk nor bike, I drove my car more than I had in the previous six months put together. I felt like an enemy of the environment every time I got in my car (twice a day sometimes!) .

Happy on the trainer at last

Happy on the trainer at last

As soon as I got clearance to try biking, I had my trainer set up. After three successful trainer sessions, I got clearance to ride outside. That was a week and a half ago. You can guess what happened next.

Yep. Saddle sore! But I don’t care, I’ll toughen up! I ride every day. Nothing more than 36 km so far, but it’s all coming back to me. Slowly.

Taking the sting out of it all: I bought myself a Brodie Once (that’s ON-say, as in the number 11 in Spanish). My triathlon season is limited to relays, and I can’t go whole-hog on road biking yet, so now’s not the year to get a full-carbon roadie with aerobars.

Now I have no excuse not to commute by bike for any trip less than 15 km one way. I’m incorporating exercise into my daily errands and trips to the pool.

The Brodie is an amazing ride; I don’t WANT to take a car when I could bike. It’s an 11-speed (you can turn it all the way up to 11!), which doesn’t make it faster necessarily, just makes it easier to climb hills. One bike guy I talked to said the extra gearing (over the Oche, or 8 speed I was considering) will give 20% extra gearing on the low end, for spinning uphill.

It goes all the way up to 11

It goes all the way up to 11

Internal gearing means less maintenance, as the drive train is protected from the wet and mud. It also allows for shifting while standing still. On my first ride I learned to stop at a light, click down three clicks, then start out in the right gear. Automagical! I don’t know why more commuters on the Wet Coast don’t have internal hubs. Also: hydraulic disc brakes. They work much better in the rain.

Because changing a flat on an internal gear hub is a royal PITA, and I never want to change a flat anyway, especially when I’m commuting and I have somewhere to be by a certain time, I changed out the tires to Gatorskins: durable, almost puncture-proof tires.

To offset the cost of this sweet Brodie ride I’m forced to sell my beloved Audrey. Any takers?

Bonus gift if you come up with a great name for my new Brodie.

 

UPDATE May 26: this post has been edited to remove some names.

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The joy of bike mechanics

I’m at bike school again – Missing Link Bike School. Last week Craig Toker, mechanic extraordinaire and proprietor, offered former students a helluva deal to jump into the 21-hour overhaul course after he had some cancellations.
Last night I replaced my rear bearings. My bike is a little finicky so, without a vice grip, it took more than a dozen adjustments and three mounts before I got the rear hub balanced properly. Once I finally did, it was like reaching the summit of a climb. So satisfying! Tonight, I true my wheels.
Needless to say, doing three hours mechanical tinkering after a full day at the office is exhausting, but I just love it. The time flies by. Fiddling with tools and grease and learning everything anew (it’s easier the second time around) is a great way to shake off a day spent at the computer.
I don’t have a second career as a bike mechanic. (Unless there really is a zombie apocalypse and everyone needs to learn a trade again – in that case I’m well set up. What – you haven’t read World War Z yet?) Then again — a bike mechanic/novel writer might be a great combination …

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