Tag Archives: change

Week 18: Finding the Raven and new heroes

An event I attended at the end of March marked, for me, the beginning of the homestretch of my temporary appointment. It was the raising of a prayer pole and warrior canoe at the Cowichan campus in Duncan, where Megan Joe became my latest hero.

Her grandfather Harold was lead carver on the project: overseeing the pole carving and doing the work alongside a team of carvers on the warrior canoe. They’re very impressive – go see them if you get a chance.

He couldn’t be there for the ceremony, so Megan read his words to the 100 or so people assembled. She was visibly petrified of speaking in public. Shaking and near tears, bolstered by her family and her community, She did it. She stood up there and did it anyway. We patiently waited and listened to Elder Harold’s words spoken through her. She was a brave young woman among all the veterans on that day. I was almost in tears with her.

I wondered if it was simply the age-old fear of public speaking that 90% of the world has, or if there was an added weight on her shoulders to represent her family in place of her grandfather, in front of her whole community. I wanted to go up to her afterwards and tell her what a wonderful job she did, that public speaking gets easier, that it’s good to feel the weight of responsibility, that she’ll grow into it, because she’s got such a strong community behind her.
I was also acutely aware this was one of my last events as a VIU employee, and it made me a little verklempt. I’m a sentimental fool, as anyone close to me knows.

One of the speakers that day explained why the Veterans Prayer pole is Raven. “The shapeshifter – he changes. Warriors must change to go to war. Some of them didn’t change back when they returned.”

April was a blur – the realization that my term here at VIU is ending has spurred a different set of tasks: reports to write, files to hand off, vacations to plan. After my last day here, I’m taking three weeks off, then deciding what direction I want to head next.

I am going to miss this place. I chose to take this job despite the distance from my home and my family, because I knew it would be a tremendous learning opportunity – a chance to shift and change in new and productive ways. I realized that day in Cowichan: I’m always seeking to learn, to grow, to change. I’ll always be touched by new heroes like Megan, and I’ll always be on the lookout for The Raven.

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Weeks 9 and 10: what’s really important

Two Tuesday mornings ago. Raining like crazy, I bailed out of our Tuesday morning walk. Took some time to look realistically at my goals, deadlines, aspirations, and interests, versus the number of hours in a day and my energy levels. And I made some decisions.

May 1 is a deadline for a writing award I want to enter. I am on a couple of volunteer committees. I have a demanding job. I am determined to get back running again and regain most of the former activity level after knee surgery a year ago.

The only way I can get this all accomplished is if I get out my inner laser pointer and focus, focus, focus.

So, two weeks ago I managed to get Chapter One of my novel re-jigged while getting my homework done in prep for the Blue Ribbon panel for judging IABC Gold Quill Award entries. Then, a group of us, all Accredited Business Communicators, met last Saturday to team up and complete the judging process. It was a lot of fun, a lot of work, and a lot of learning.

This past Tuesday: woke up near Whistler in a retreat facility. with a tension headache, but also a thirst for learning. I took the intensive three-day Prosci Change Management Certification course last week in the midst of back problems. This (trying something new, then the back problems) is a natural progression for me.

Change Management–

Communications and marketing is all about persuading people to change their minds about something, and take action. Increasingly, professional communicators are asked to help out with organizational transformations: changes in technology, processes, leadership, etc.

We’re sometimes told: “If we could only communicate this better to staff, they wouldn’t be so resistant. We need you, communications people, to deliver us some results in this area!” My answer to this has always been: “I can’t create change on behalf of leadership unless the leadership is seen to be behind this change 100%. Leadership has to walk the talk.”

Now I have the data and training to back that up. Change management, I had intuitively known, is more than communications. It is a systematic process that has to be supported from the top and reinforced all the way through an organization. Change is supported through communications, but it is done by individuals.

Regarding the back problems – the more stressed I get, the more a hunch up my back and get headaches. I’ve come to learn that doesn’t mean the stress I’m under is bad, it means I’m under some kind of transformation myself. It means I’m learning; it’s a signal I need to pay attention to the change I’m experiencing at that moment. The best way to deal with change (and the stress that comes with it) is to find ways to relax into it, stretch often, keep hydrated, and rest when necessary.

And find a good physiotherapist.

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Ken and I at ETUG Fall 2014

Goodbye BCcampus, Hello Vancouver Community College

Today is officially my last day at BCcampus, and my last day as an official resident of Victoria. I’ll be making sure everything’s all tied in a bow and handed off today, and dropping off my computer and keys to the Victoria office in the afternoon.
Ken and I at ETUG Fall 2014

Best thing about working at BCcampus? I met my partner at a work conference. Here we are at the 2014 Fall ETUG workshop.

When David Porter and Paul Stacey hired me almost five years ago, they assured me I would find a home in an innovative, nimble and forward-thinking organization. They were right. BCcampus stoked my professional creativity in immeasurable ways; I learned a great deal about post-secondary education and technology, and the ways technology intersects with learning, teaching, and mediates and enables relationships of all kinds, if you use it right. I can honestly say I’ve never worked before with such committed, forward-thinking people. Just goes to show what can happen if you let people be free to do what they do best!

I hope I’ve been able to show my colleague’s best work (and the work of our stakeholders) to our broader stakeholder groups over the last five years. They have made my job easy.
Next week I’m stepping into a larger organization (there are 22,000 students at VCC!), leading a department of 13 people who are tasked with marketing and communications. It’s quite a step from BCcampus small but mighty communications department of 2.5 plus contractors (although I have supervised a shop of up to 8 previously). But one of the things I learned here is the importance of figuring out how to scale up.
You’ve taught me well, BCcampus!
The good thing is, I’ll be staying in the post-secondary system, so it doesn’t really feel like I’m saying goodbye, just “see you later!”

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Photo by Dennis Yip, copyright BCcampus, used under Creative Commons license.
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